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The Two Faces of Hacking (CHART)

Digg: Tech - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 14:20
Some hackers use software and hardware to express themselves creatively—either solving entirely novel technical challenges or finding new ways to skin the same old cats. Others are motivated by money, power, politics, or pure mischief. They steal identities, deface Web sites, and break into supposedly secure and certainly sensitive databases.


Categories: Tech

Apple becomes latest ‘Anonymous’ hacker target

Digg: Tech - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 11:13
Notorious hacker collective “Anonymous Operations” on Sunday published data it claims to have obtained by breaching a server belonging to Apple. The data, which consisted of 27 usernames and passwords, was allegedly taken from surveys stored on an Apple server.


Categories: Tech

Why Google+ could find a home in the workplace

Digg: Tech - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 11:09
Last week, Google rolled out a largely well-received beta of its new social networking platform, Google+. Having played with Google+ over the last few days, I think that it may find a home in a perhaps unexpected market: the workplace.


Categories: Tech

The iCade review: your iPad as an arcade machine

ArsTechnica - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 10:00

The iCade might have started its life as an April Fools gag but, as Think Geek told us after the Internet went wild for the concept, some jokes have a way of becoming reality. The $100 iCade is now available, and we've had the chance to open one, assemble the hardware, and play for a number of hours. There are a few annoyances here, but this is an impressive way of adding physical controls to the iPad in a package that's both an instant conversation starter and small enough to fit on your desk.

I have yet to see anyone take a look at this thing and not immediately want to play it. My kids have been going ape playing the classic Atari games. It's easy to look past the hardware's uncertain future when the present is already so striking.

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Categories: Tech

Maths powers Google bid strategy

Digg: Tech - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 09:28
Google drew on mathematical constants and astronomical units while bidding for a pool of mobile phone patents.


Categories: Tech

Not Entangled by <em>Quantum Thief</em>

Wired: Gadgets - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 09:00
Writing book reviews can be difficult. One person may like a book... another person may not. As a rule, I don't like to review books that I haven't enjoyed. I know how difficult it can be to write a book, and I know that in addition to large amounts of time and planning, a writer ...


Categories: Tech

The tablet will be the center of the connected lifestyle

Digg: Tech - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 08:10
Tablets are taking our entertainment experience in a new direction, and in the next two-to-five years, the tablet could serve as your secondary video screen or universal remote control. All of which means that the future of the digital home is already here.


Categories: Tech

Five Reasons Why the iPad Was Made to Keep Parents Sane

Wired: Gadgets - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 08:00
Being a tech dad is a curse. We are always chasing the latest and greatest that tech minds are producing despite our economic status, how many kids we have or whether or not the CFO at home (the wife) will approve. We want it. We need to have it. We don??t want to wait. We don??t ...


Categories: Tech

Plastic Case Protects Your Precious iPad from Spills, But Not Dunks

Wired: Gadgets - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 07:00
Dropping $500 on an iPad? Ouch. Dropping a soda on said device? $!%*!#@!!!


Categories: Tech

10 Robust Sites To Determine How Fast Any Web Page Loads

Digg: Tech - Mon, 2011/07/04 - 05:59
Read about each of the ten entries and determine yourself that how all of these are different and unique with each others.


Categories: Tech

Musicians, tune your keyboards: playing in a laptop orchestra

ArsTechnica - Sun, 2011/07/03 - 15:00

The words "laptop orchestra" might conjure up visions of zombie-like players seated at their computers—LAN party style—controlling electronic sounds that form some sort of musical performance. The reality is much more exciting, according to composer, performer, and professor Dan Trueman, who co-founded the Princeton Laptop Orchestra (also known as PLOrk) in 2005 and has since led the proliferation of laptop orchestras around the globe.

According to Trueman, laptop orchestras transcend "old world" performances by offering a new way for people to make music together. They also challenge the traditional notion of what's considered a musical instrument.

Is this just a new fad for music hipsters? Trueman would say: maybe, but who cares?

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GeekDad Game Review: <em>Seven Dragons</em> From Looney Labs

Wired: Gadgets - Sun, 2011/07/03 - 07:00
Overview: Seven Dragons, the latest card game from Looney Labs, is a quick dominoes-style card game that has you matching up colored dragons in a race to get seven cards connected before the other players. As you might expect from Looney Labs, though, goals can change mid-game and you never know what might happen before ...


Categories: Tech

ARM chips to rival PS3, Xbox 360 in 18 months?

ArsTechnica - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 17:30

ARM has been beating the performance drum again, this time telling the Inquirer that a new Mali GPU design due out in 18 months will make its chips the equal of current-gen gaming consoles like the Xbox 360 and the Playstation 3. There can be little doubt that an ARM-based mobile chip will surpass these two consoles in pixel-pushing capacity (measured variously) at some point in the future, but we've heard this kind of talk about Mali before.

Some Googling turns up 2009 and 2010 as years when Mali was supposed to bring Xbox 360-level graphics to mobiles, and we're certain that if we went past the first page of search results we could find more.

But whatever ARM has said in the past, it's not really a stretch to imagine this happening in roughly an 18-month timeframe. For reference, at the 2010 ISSCC, Microsoft showed off the SoC that powers the latest version of the Xbox 360, a combo chip that puts the CPU and GPU of the console on the same 45nm die and clocks in at only 372 million transistors. That's a bit over 100 million transistors more than NVIDIA's 40nm Tegra 2 mobile chip from that same year. So yes, given a process shrink to 28nm or thereabouts, it seems quite possible that ARM will at the very least be able to pack as much hardware as the Xbox 360 does into an application processor.

So much for ARM's Mali claims. The much more interesting question is, what will NVIDIA have out at this point? 

The company's upcoming Kal-El part is due out in the second half of this year, and it could well bring something approaching console-level performance to tablets and other portables. And 18 months from now, we may begin to see something out of Project Denver, which could well make for a killer desktop gaming chip (assuming that any games will run on it).

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Categories: Tech

Samsung drops (one) Apple patent countersuit

ArsTechnica - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 15:29

After Apple sued Samsung back in April over claims that the Korean company's Galaxy line of smartphones and tablets ripped off Apple's iPhone software, hardware, and design patents, Samsung fired back. It filed lawsuits against Apple in Europe and Asia, and it filed a patent infringement countersuit against Apple here in the US.

That lawsuit quickly got messy, with both sides demanding access to unreleased prototypes of the other's hardware as part of the case and firing off accusations of harassment at their opponents. Today, though, it was reported that Samsung decided to drop its US countersuit.

According to Bloomberg, which got hold of a Samsung rep in Seoul, the case was actually dismissed on June 30. The dismissal will "streamline" Samsung's legal caseload, according to the report, but Samsung will continue its overseas cases and continue to prosecute an earlier US case against Apple.

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Categories: Tech

Microsoft follows Google's lead, cancels Hohm energy service

ArsTechnica - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 15:00

On Thursday, Microsoft announced that it was shutting down its home energy monitoring service, Hohm. The move comes just days after Google announced that it was discontinuing its equivalent service, PowerMeter. Google's cancellation was coupled with the termination of its medical software, Google Health; so far, there's no indication that Microsoft intends to cancel its equivalent offering, Health Vault.

Both Google and Microsoft entered the energy field several years ago at a time when it appeared that it had significant growth potential. Many utilities were beginning to offer smart meters and other services that could give home users finer-grained information on and control of their energy use. Rising energy prices also seemed likely to motivate consumers to exert greater control over how they used their power.

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Categories: Tech

Week in Apple: Why Thunderbolt cables cost fifty bucks

ArsTechnica - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 12:00

The biggest Apple news dropped right at the end of the week—Lion has just hit "gold master" status and should make its way to the Mac App Store for downloading soon. When that happens, look for our unbelievably in-depth uber-review—and clear your calendar. (Seriously, it's a monster.)

While waiting for Lion, though, why not catch up on the top bits of Apple news from the week that was:

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Categories: Tech

Week in gaming: Supreme Court strikes down Cali's gaming law

ArsTechnica - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 11:00

The Supreme Court struck down California's gaming law in a 7-2 decision, and now the gaming industry has a strong precedent to keep laws like this from springing up again. This was big news for the industry. Games are considered legally protected expression; now it's time for developers to ask themselves if they actually have anything to say.

Check out the rest of the big stories from last week, and catch up on anything you missed.

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Categories: Tech

Week in technology: Google+ launches as the Lulz Boat sinks

ArsTechnica - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 10:00

MySpace was sold… for a mere $35 million. Google+ was launched. LulzSec sank the Lulz Boat. The run-up to the July 4 Independence Day celebrations here in the US wasn't a quiet one after all—and here are the top ten general tech news stories of the week, collected for your reading pleasure.

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Categories: Tech

Contest: Remix the "GeekDad" Song (GeekDad Weekly Rewind)

Wired: Gadgets - Sat, 2011/07/02 - 08:30
GeekDad by John Anealio Want a chance to win some awesome prizes from Wired and ThinkGeek? Then enter the "GeekDad" Remix Contest! First, if you haven't heard the "GeekDad" song yet, click the play button on the player above. You can even download it absolutely free, just click the Download button on the player above or click ...


Categories: Tech

So sue me: are lawyers really the key to computer security?

ArsTechnica - Fri, 2011/07/01 - 18:00

If your code gets hacked, are you the one on the hook? In the early decades of the software industry, the answer was usually "no." Software licenses routinely disclaimed liability, and until recently, security flaws were considered to be just another fact of life. When problems were discovered, companies were expected to fix them quickly, but they were rarely on the hook for the resulting damage.

That's changing rapidly. Recently, Sony faced a class action lawsuit for losing the private information of millions of users. And this week, it was reported that Dropbox is already being sued for a recent security breach of its own.

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